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20121006
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on what happened last night, say yes, now i am for sure going to be for romney or does it have that kind of impact do you think? >> let me start off, to me, i think we all agree this is going to be a closer race. and it in close races everything matters more. so, you know i think it will. i think historically vice presidential debates don't matter a whole lot. and somebody last night, can't remember who it was, was making the point that lloyd denson destroyed dan quayle. it didn't make any difference but he destroyed him. so i don't know but do you guys want to take a swing at that? >> i think there are two presidential debates after that one, so i think it will be more watched by folks like us in politics whereas i think the overall electorate and i'm not downplaying the importance of the vice presidential but charlie is right, it could have -- anything could make a difference. but it would be surprising to me. >> it's like in the olympics when they had the basketball games for the bronze medal. waiting for the gold medal game, this bronze medal game but do you know what? is the only de
, and last night when we heard governor romney talk about states as the laboratory of democracy so while that may have been a republican democrat comment it got me thinking about our mayor and the work that they do in their communities and i'm going to hand the floor over to them. if you could both talk a little bit about how you see the future of american politics. >> thank you for having us first of all and thanks to all of you for coming to this event. i do believe that our politics is local and as mayor i've had the opportunity to witness decision-making on a local level that has implications for the state and federal government. i will just briefly talk about my background and how i first got into the position as mayor. holyoke is a small city of about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachusetts. i was born and raised there and went to the city's public schools became the first to my family to go on to college and when i got to brown studied urban studies there and like a lot of folks my age i chose to come back to my hometown and give back to the city
line. >> caller: how are you doing? >> host: are you going to watch tomorrow night? how come? >> guest: to see who romney is and -- >> host: have you already made up your mind? >> caller: not really. not really. >> host: john and mean joins on the independent line. good morning, john. >> caller: good morning. how are you? >> host: are you watching tomorrow night? >> caller: i will be watching but i'm a student of human nature, really. that's all. politicians will always be politicians so i am not a fanatic on either side. i think i'm just watching to see how it goes. promises don't mean nothing because without the senate or the congress they don't mean nothing. if they are not backed up they don't mean nothing. but it's nice to watch and see what they will promise. they will probably promise anything. like i said, i am from an old school of politics. i was brought up in new york at the tail end of the hall if you know what that was. anyway, i've just been watching out of curiosity on how they present themselves more and more out of anything else. i don't have another particular party o
and ten minutes. >> i would like to hear from all of you and, you know, last night when we think governor romney talked about states as the laboratory of democracy while that may have been eight republican versus democrat, and it got me thinking about our mayors and what they do in the community. and so i'm going to hand the floor over to them so you can dhaka little bit about how to see the future of american politics from where you sit. >> thank you for having us and all of you for coming to this event. i do believe that the politics are local and as the mayor i've had the opportunity to witness decision making on local level that i think has implications for the state and the federal government. i will just briefly talk about my background how i first got into the position as the mayor in a small city about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachusetts. i was born and raised there and went to the public schools and when i got into brown studied urban studies there and unlike a lot of folks my age to give back to the city that i thought had given me the oppor
this is really great, 65%. he said no, i want 90. congressman gordon, your thoughts on obama and romney's leadership. >> well, if we tie back to the campaign in to the 50.1%, i think that is telling. i was with charlie cook last night. he is one of the political and gnostic hitters around you, and charlie famously said something back that is present obama is related it will be to spite the economy if governor romney is elected it will be despite his campaign. and i think that is playing out right now. and i think part of it is this 50.1% attitude. i think the other thing, governor romney i think grew up in a privileged environment. just like i want to get my daughter all i can come his father wanted to do the same take. mccain was somewhat isolated with the schools and elite i think sort of thinking along the way. and i think he also, his parents instilled upon him that because of those privileges he had responsibility. and that is what you might say class had responsibility to give back and to be a leader later. so i think he wants to be president because he wants to make good decision
the candidates and the party should be discussing. next wednesday night the presidential debate begins. this for in our discussion with the obama and romney campaigns and as we've looked at the party platform, we have seen lots of attention being paid to child care and early learning that we might have expected. both in the presidential and also in the congressional races. given the research that points to the impact of attention to their earliest years of life, and given the of vintages of child care and helping low-income workers, we might have expected, for example, democrats to focus on child care after obama had been criticized for allowing flexibility for states and welfare work requirements. given the gender gap that the republicans face and need to overcome and given that child care is an issue many working mothers have been concerned about for a long time we might have expected detention to be paid by republicans. as i reported in the recent huffingtonpost.com peace and others talked about there's been insufficient attention paid by the campaigns in the opinion of many. the si
of barack obama. >> wednesday, president obama and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. the news our jim lehrer moderates. watch and engage with c-span including our live to be preachy at 7 p.m. eastern. the debate at night and post debate, your reaction, calls e-mails and tweets. fall live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. spent up next, white house officials in charge of cybersecurity speak about the growing concern over counterfeit computer parts and software. they spoke at the potomac institute on computer network threats posed by a foldable supply chain. this is about two hours. >> ladies and gentlemen, if i could have your attention, please. minus michael swetnam and on michael swetnam and ceo of the potomac institute for policy studies, and it's my distinct honor and courage to welcome you here today for a seminar on supply chain threat of cyber issue that we have been discussing in and around washington for quite some time. the potomac institute, for those of you have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit polic
i think that is telling. i was with charlie cook last night. one of the prognosticators around here. charlie famously set some time back that if president obama is reelected it will be despite the economy. if governor romney gets elected it will be despite his campaign. and i think that is playing out right now, and that the part of it is this 50 percent attitude. i think the other thing, governor romney, i think he grew up in a privileged environment. just like i want to give my daughter all that i can. his father wanted to do the same. became, you know, was somewhat isolated with the schools. i think sort of thinking along the way. and i think he also, his parents instill upon them that because of those privileges he had a responsibility. and that is, what you might say, class and the responsibility to give back and to, you know, to be a leader. and so i think he wants to be president because he wants to make good decisions. he once said, with the circumstances as the ambassador said, he wants to reorganize the government so that it's efficient. but unlike bill clinton who could t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8